Showing posts tagged Orson Welles
networkawesome:

Movie - F For Fake (Orson Welles, 1974)
Orson Welles meta-documentary on film and artifice.  

networkawesome:

Movie - F For Fake (Orson Welles, 1974)

Orson Welles meta-documentary on film and artifice.  

(Reblogged from networkawesome)

nefariouscinephile:

“What we professional liars hope to serve is truth. I’m afraid the pompous word for that is ‘art’.”

(Reblogged from nefariouscinephile)

Holy shit. 

A man who lives in my town knew Orson Welles. 

Holy shit. 

A woman who lives in my town is the only surviving cast member of Brief Encounter

Holy shit. 

I thought I lived in the middle of nowhere. 

fuckyeahmattepaintings:

Saturday Special: Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles) is famous for cinematographer Gregg Toland’s innovative use of deep focus techniques. In this scene, which might conventionally be told in three shots (a close-up on the medicine bottle, a medium of Susan on the bed, and then a wide of Kane entering the room), all three planes remain in sharp focus through the use of a matte shot. The extreme foreground was shot first, with the rest of the scene dark, then the film was rewound and only the middle-ground was lit and shot, and the same for the background. Many special effects in early films, like those of Georges Méliès, relied on this multiple exposure technique; the disadvantage is that if any of the takes went wrong, the whole process would have to start again. 
The result is one of the most striking images in a film full of striking images.

fuckyeahmattepaintings:

Saturday Special: Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles) is famous for cinematographer Gregg Toland’s innovative use of deep focus techniques. In this scene, which might conventionally be told in three shots (a close-up on the medicine bottle, a medium of Susan on the bed, and then a wide of Kane entering the room), all three planes remain in sharp focus through the use of a matte shot. The extreme foreground was shot first, with the rest of the scene dark, then the film was rewound and only the middle-ground was lit and shot, and the same for the background. Many special effects in early films, like those of Georges Méliès, relied on this multiple exposure technique; the disadvantage is that if any of the takes went wrong, the whole process would have to start again. 

The result is one of the most striking images in a film full of striking images.

(Reblogged from fuckyeahmattepaintings)